The Fate of Fausto Book Events

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Oliver Jeffers Studio is pleased to celebrate the launch of The Fate of Fausto with a week of book events in London!

September 9 - September 15, 2019

September 9
Creative Review / House of Illustration in conversation with Eliza Williams

King’s Place, 90 York Way

September 12 - 24
The Fate of Fausto Exhibition
2-5 Sackville Street

September 14
Signing at Waterstones Kensington
193 Kensington High Street

September 14
Signing at Waterstones Oxford
William Blake House
Broad Street, Oxford

September 15
Signing at Waterstones Oxford
11a Union Galleries
Broadmead, Bristol

September 15
The Egg Theatre
Theatre Royal Bath
Sawclose, Bath

The Fate of Fausto: A Painted Fable

“Almost 5 years ago I wrote a short story about a man who believed he owned everything.
I sidelined it to make way for Here We Are as that felt a more important book at the time. Three years ago I began working on art for this story, which was then made sporadically over the course of almost a year at the esteemed Idem Editions lithography press in Paris, and now The Fate Of Fausto is finally ready to be released. A fable of the follies of arrogance, greed, and the our relationship with nature, it felt timely 5 years ago when I wrote it, but, sadly, it feels urgent now. “ - Oliver Jeffers

The Fate of Fausto is nearly here! view the book trailer here and in London, opening September 13th at Sotheran’s Rare Book & Print Shop, Oliver is please to present The Fate of Fausto launch exhibition of artworks and artifacts that take a look at the story behind the story.

Oliver Jeffers exhibition distills a world in flux

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Creative Review, article by Megan Williams. Read the full story.

Most widely known for his children’s books, Jeffers returns with a new exhibition that holds a magnifying glass over the chaos of the world we live in Observations on Modern Life takes a critical glance at the current socio-political climate in various parts of the world, drawing – sometimes literally – on geography and cartography as starting points. The exhibition, which has just opened at London’s Lazinc gallery, features roughly 50 pieces created by Jeffers over the past ten years, among them sculptures, paintings, collages and found images.

“In recent years I have started taking political motivations for how maps have been drawn, and turning them on their head, using the visual language of cartography as a means to make other social commentary,” Jeffers said of his work. His oil painting Map of Land and Sea with Borders is a perfect embodiment of this, the world’s existing borders haphazardly skewed into new territories and seas. “By making environmental, apolitical and sometimes humorous comments on maps and globes, I have been addressing issues I feel strongly about regarding how random maps are in the first place, how arbitrary the carving up of things and drawing of borders are.”

Although Observations on Modern Life plays host to decidedly grown up subject matters, Jeffers teases the same childlike character and quiet sense of humour he’s become known for over time. And despite what the name of the exhibition suggests, his work doesn’t seem to make observations but rather ask questions – something children master with unflinching ease.

Sometimes it takes a child to speak some sense. When you can’t find one, then listen to a children’s author.

Oliver Jeffers returns to the capital

London Live, video by Luke Blackall. Read the full story.

The artist and author Oliver Jeffers is back in the capital, with his third solo exhibition.

Observations on Modern Life is the first to showcase the collage work of the Northern Irish artist, with more than 50 pieces created over the last decade which capture his style of adding humour to futile situations.

The exhibition is on at the Lazinc Gallery.

Oliver Jeffers' Observations on Modern Life

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Creative Boom, article by Emily Gosling. Read the full story.

Best known to most for his kiddie-friendly illustration work, a new London exhibition celebrates Oliver Jeffers' sculptural and collage work created over the past 10 years.

Showing around 50 pieces, the show, entitled Observations on Modern Life, deals with the “Wild West of future living,” according to the Lazinc gallery exhibiting the work.

“It is a great and confusing time to be on earth,” says Jeffers. “Life has never been safer and more pleasant, historically speaking, however with increasingly efficient ways of travelling and communicating—the more anyone gets done, the busier they seem to be. With the ability to hear from anyone anywhere about anything, humans are somehow not clearer in their thoughts and actions, but rather more distracted.”

Collage, then, feels like a fitting medium to attempt to grapple with this ongoing noise. In typical Jeffers style, he chooses to negotiate these big issues with humour and playfulness to counterbalance the poignancy.

Among the pieces on show are Jeffers’ Disaster Series, which reacts to “found land and seascapes” by “completing” them through deft additions to the scenes.

“Knowing where I am in relation to other things has always been fascinating to me,” Jeffers adds. “I suppose I’ve been blessed with an innate sense of direction, and a curiosity to know my place. In recent years I have started taking political motivations for how maps have been drawn, and turning them on their head, using the visual language of cartography as a means to make another social commentary.

“By making environmental, apolitical and sometimes humorous comments on maps and globes, I have been addressing issues I feel strongly about regarding how random maps are in the first place, how arbitrary the carving up of things and drawing of borders are.”

Take that, Brexit.

Oliver Jeffers: Observations on Modern Life runs until 15 May 2019 at Lazinc, London.

New fable by Oliver Jeffers from HarperCollins

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The Bookseller, article by Charlotte Eyre. Read the full story.

Oliver Jeffers’ next book, due for release by HarperCollins Children’s Books in September, will be a modern-day fable for readers of all ages.

The Fate of Fausto, created using traditional lithographic printmaking techniques at a Paris fine-art printing house, is about a man called Fausto who wants to own everything he sees.

Jeffers said: “The Fate of Fausto was written over three years ago. It felt timely then, and even more so now. I was in a car on the north coast of Antrim, overlooking the sea while watching a storm come in. My thoughts wandered to my smallness against this rolling giant, and I thought of how much control we believe we have on nature when surely it’s the opposite. All the things on the pages are those I saw around me in that moment. While the story is a fable for today, it also feels like an old tale. To honour this timelessness, I wanted to make it using traditional lithography and typesetting. The results are mildly controlled accidents that have stumbled upon beauty. This book feels radically different from any of my other books, but I feel it might hold the most power and importance in its intentions.”

According to HarperCollins Jeffers has sold more than 12 million books worldwide and his works have been translated into 45 languages. He has won prizes including the Nestlé Children’s Book Prize Gold Award, the Blue Peter Book of the Year, the Irish Children’s Book of the Year. He is represented by Paul Moreton of Bell Lomax Moreton.

20 questions with... Oliver Jeffers

GQ, Read the full story here.

Oliver Jeffers is an Northern Irish artist, designer, illustrator and writer. Jeffers is most well-known for his picture books, especially Here We Are, his most recent publication. The work he produces varies from figurative painting, collage, installation and illustration and he is just about to launch, in April, his largest UK solo exhibition to date at the Lazinc Gallery, called Observations On Modern Life.

“Knowing where I am in relation to other things has always been fascinating to me," says Jeffers. "I suppose I’ve been blessed with an innate sense of direction and a curiosity to know my place. In recent years I have started taking political motivations for how maps have been drawn and turning them on their head, using the visual language of cartography as a means to make other social commentary. By making environmental, apolitical and sometimes humorous comments on maps and globes, I have been addressing issues I feel strongly about regarding how random maps are in the first place, how arbitrary the carving up of things and drawing of borders are.”

Observations On Modern Life is a showcase of approximately 50 of Jeffers' sculptural and collage work from the past decade. The exhibition will portray his engagement with contemporary life, presenting both the manic speed in which we live and society’s rapid consumption of information.

We Connect Ourselves to Everything: Artist Oliver Jeffers on the Planet We Call Home

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ARTNEWS, article by Claire Selvin. Read the full story.

“If you are in a shipwreck and all the boats are gone,” R. Buckminster Fuller wrote in 1968, “a piano top buoyant enough to keep you afloat that comes along makes a fortuitous life preserver. But this is not to say that the best way to design a life preserver is in the form of a piano top.” However effective it might be for saving a life, a piano top can make for an intriguing subject for art—as one does in Oliver Jeffers’s exhibition at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery in New York, where images of piano tops appear in paintings and sculpture as part a hanging installation that also includes a globe, a matchstick, a rowboat, and a car.

“This was fun,” Jeffers said, citing the Fuller quote as an inspiration for his arrangement in the space. “My work is too playful to just have canvases on walls.” Indeed, Jeffers’s practice extends beyond painting and installation. The Brooklyn-based artist is also an author and illustrator of children’s books, and his current exhibition, “For All We Know,” shares similarities with his 2017 bestseller Here We Are: Notes for Surviving the Planet, a how-to guide for navigating Earth and co-existing with its many creatures.

Though he is distinguished for his books (which have won him a New York Times Best Illustrated Children’s Book Award and an Irish Book Award, among other prizes), Jeffers began his career as a painter and discovered bookmaking “by accident.” “The books have always come from the things that I’m exploring in my fine art practice, and there’s a humor and accessibility to the fine art that wouldn’t exist without the books,” he said. Unlike books, however, art has no clear beginning, middle, or end. “This is so much more freewheeling and nebulous than that,” he said of his exhibition.

The show features richly colored paintings filled with deep purples and blues that often signal the vastness of outer space and the sea. One work shows two astronauts clinging to a piano in the middle of the ocean, not far from fiery wreckage of the Titanic. Another canvas, Constellation Road Map (2018), depicts a car barreling down a wide highway that cuts across a barren desert, with a star formation on a road sign and in the sky above. The paintings exude a whimsical spirit that carries over into the installation.

Oliver Jeffers, The Moon, the Earth & Us, hard-coated foam, steel, and acrylic.

DAN BRADICA/COURTESY OLIVER JEFFERS STUDIO

Jeffers’s works are like onions, he said, with their multiple layers of meaning—though he hardly intends for them be solved like puzzles. He doesn’t want viewers to “follow the clues and unlock some message. All of it comes from this awareness that we’re part of a larger system, and there’s a humility and a responsibility that comes with that.”

On request, however, Jeffers will happily expound. He said the bonfire in The Twelfth (2018), for instance, is a reference to a holiday celebrated in July by Protestants in Northern Ireland, where he was born. The event commemorates the defeat of the Catholic King James II by the Protestant William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. Jeffers said he was interested in the kind of ritualization that attends “relishing in this glorified history.”

Jeffers’s recent High Line installation, which ran through February 7, was called The Moon, the Earth, and Us, and it comprised two globes separated by the distance of a city block—to illustrate the concept of what he called the “overview effect.” The phenomenon experienced by astronauts when they view Earth from space renders borders invisible, and Jeffers said that such dissolution of arbitrary distinctions extends to the art in his Wolkowitz exhibition as well. “A lot of this comes down to narrative and perspective,” he said. “We write ourselves into stories. We connect ourselves to everything.”